October 1, 2009

Miro Study Journal Page 4

Miro's issue with seeing only subjectively was helped by a teacher, Francisco Gali.  He advised Miro to learn to feel or touch objects such as clay, then draw.  So Miro would manipulate the clay into a shape and then he would draw from "memory" that the clay left him.  Miro claimed that these exercises were crucial to his development as an artist.

"Even today, thirty years after, the effect of this touch-drawing experience returns in my interest in scuplture:  the need to mold with my hands - to pickup a ball of wet clay like a child and squeeze it.  From this I get a physical satisfaction that I cannot get from drawing or painting."

I think that Miro shows us the value of trying different mediums as they help us to see things in different ways.

Kristin Andreassen - Crayola Doesn't Make A Color For Your Eyes